Pickle Parkway – State Highway 130 Austin Truck Accident Lawyer

Pickle Parkway – State Highway 130 Austin Truck Accident Lawyer

Seeking a Free Consultation with one of Texas’ Austin Car Accident Lawyers? Call the Austin Car Accident Lawyer Reshard Alexander today at 512.222.9593.

Best Houston Car Accident LawyerTexas State Highway 130 (SH 130), also known as the Pickle Parkway, is a highway from Interstate 35 (I-35) in San Antonio along I-410 and I-10 to east of Seguin, then north as tollway from there to I-35 north of Georgetown.[1] SH 130 runs in a 91-mile (146 km) corridor east and south of Austin. The route parallels I-35 and is intended to relieve the Interstate’s traffic volume through the San Antonio–Austin corridor by serving as an alternate route.

The highway was developed in response to the tremendous surge in truck traffic on the I-35 corridor brought on by the North American Free Trade Agreement during the late 1990s, especially truck traffic originating from Laredo, where the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) reported 150 trucks entering the United States every hour. A proponent of the highway’s development, Capital Area Transportation Coalition, said that congestion along the I-35 corridor is costing businesses more than $194 million a year in higher operating costs and lost productivity.

The highway is noted for having a speed limit of at least 80 mph (130 km/h) along its tolled section. The 41-mile (66 km) section of the toll road between SH 45 and I-10 has a posted speed limit of 85 mph (137 km/h), the highest posted speed limit in the United States.

SH 130 was originally designated in far west Texas, between the city of El Paso and SH 54 in El PasoHudspeth, and Culberson counties. That route was designated on January 18, 1928.[2][3] In 1932, the route was co-designated as a portion of US 62.[4] On January 21, 1936, SH 130 was extended east to the New Mexico state line, replacing a portion of SH 54.[5] The SH 130 designation was dropped with the general re-description of the state highway system on September 26, 1939. Since September 6, 1943, the previous route has also been designated as a portion of US 180 along with US 62.[6]

Seeking a Free Consultation with one of Texas’ Austin Car Accident Lawyers? Call the Austin Car Accident Lawyer Reshard Alexander today at 512.222.9593.

SH 130 was designated on May 22, 1985, along with SH 45, as a route from I-35 to US 183 south of Austin. On January 30, 1989, SH 297 was designated from US 183 in Mendoza to I-10 in Seguin. On December 8, 1993, SH 297 became part of SH 130. On October 27, 1994, the SH 130 sections were connected with part of the SH 130 tollway along US 183 added to the plans.

In June 2002, Lone Star Infrastructure, a consortium of major highway construction contractors and civil engineering firms, was awarded a Comprehensive Development Agreement by TxDOT to design and build the section from I-35 in Georgetown to US 183 southeast of Austin.[7] The cost of this section was expected to be $1.5 billion, which included the costs of utility relocation, design, construction, and right-of-way. Right-of-way costs alone were estimated at $389 million.

Groundbreaking for SH 130 took place on October 3, 2003. The first segment to open to the public was from US 290 northbound to US 79 on November 1, 2006. On December 13, the highway was extended northward to a junction with I-35. On September 6, 2007, the route was extended southward from US 290 to SH 71. Segment 4 opened on April 30, 2008, running 8.7 miles (14.0 km) from SH 71 to US 183.[8]

On June 28, 2006, a partnership between Cintra and Zachry American Infrastructure, developers of the Trans-Texas Corridor, reached a $1.3 billion agreement with the state to build segments 5 and 6 from US 183 southeast of Austin to I-10 in Seguin. Cintra-Zachry formed SH 130 Concession Company to manage the project. In exchange for the investment, the company received the right to collect tolls for 50 years in a revenue-sharing agreement with the state. The state owns the road while the company is responsible for financing, design, construction, operation, and maintenance over the life of the agreement.[9] Although substantially a private sector project, some costs for segments 5 and 6 were borne by TxDOT, including about 400 highway signs promoting SH 130 as an alternate route and a subsidized toll rate for truckers to use the highway instead of I-35.[10] In 2013, Moody’s downgraded the company’s debt to junk status due to low traffic revenues, raising the possibility that TxDOT might terminate its toll contract with the group.[10] The company explored debt restructuring around December 2013,[11] and was in danger of a payment default in June 2014,[12] eventually filing for bankruptcy in March 2016.[13]

The 2007 session of the Texas Legislature passed HB 2296, designating SH 130 in WilliamsonTravisCaldwell, and Guadalupe counties as the “Pickle Parkway” in honor of former United States Congressman J.J. “Jake” Pickle.[14] Construction began in early 2009 on the final sections of SH 130, from Lockhart through Caldwell and Guadalupe counties to I-10, which opened on October 24, 2012.[15] On the first evening the roadway was open, three cars crashed into packs of wild hogs.[16] US 183 runs parallel to SH 130 from southeast of Austin to Lockhart.

TxDOT announced on September 29, 2011, that the SH 130 designation had been extended westward, along I-10 to I-410, then southward and westward along I-410 to I-35 in southern San Antonio.[17] On March 2, 2016, the SH 130 Concession Company, who operates the toll road between Seguin and Mustang Ridge, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy. The concession’s CEO, Alfonso Orol, stated that the highway will continue to operate during the bankruptcy proceedings.[18]

Pickle Parkway – State Highway 130 Austin Truck Accident Lawyer

Seeking a Free Consultation with one of Texas’ Austin Car Accident Lawyers? Call the Austin Car Accident Lawyer Reshard Alexander today at 512.222.9593.

It is advisable to consult Austin truck accident attorney Reshard Alexander who will help determine liability and the right compensation amount that you should get for your injuries. The insurance company of the at-fault driver may not be willing to pay for damages and I can help you with the negotiation process. Call me today at (512) 222.9593 for a free consultation.

Austin Car Accident Lawyer Glove Compartment Guide

Most Dangerous Roads in Austin Links
Interstate 35
US 183
Manor Expressway 290
State Highway 45
10th Mountain Division Highway – State Highway 71
State Highway 95
Pickle Parkway – State Highway 130
State Highway 165
Mopac Expressway Loop 1
Spur 69 Koenig Lane
Airport Boulevard – State Highway Loop 111
State Highway Loop 212
State Highway Loop 275
State Highway 343
Capital of Texas State Highway Loop 360
Parmer Lane – FM 734
Martin Luther King Blvd – FM 969
Burnet Road – FM 1325
Pecan Street – FM 1825
Ranch to Market Road 2222
Bee Caves Road FM 2244
Manchaca Road FM 2304
Pace Bend Road FM 3322
Wharf Cove RM 2769
Decker Lane FM 3177
Hamilton Pool Road RM 3238

Attorney Reshard AlexanderBig Rig Bull Texas Truck Accident Lawyer represents clients in all Texas counties, including: Anderson, Andrews, Angelina, Aransas, Archer, Armstrong, Atascosa, Austin, Bailey, Bandera, Bastrop, Baylor, Bee, Bell, Bexar, Blanco, Borden, Bosque, Bowie, Brazoria, Brazos, Brewster, Briscoe, Brooks, Brown, Burleson, Burnet, Caldwell, Calhoun, Callahan, Cameron, Camp, Carson, Cass, Castro, Chambers, Cherokee,Childress, Clay, Cochran, Coke, Coleman, Collin, Collingsworth, Colorado, Comal, Comanche, Concho, Cooke, Coryell, Cottle, Crane, Crockett, Crosby, Culberson, Dallam, Dallas, Dawson, Deaf Smith, Delta, Denton, DeWitt, Dickens, Dimmit, Donley, Duval, Eastland, Ector, Edwards, El Paso, Ellis, Erath, Falls, Fannin, Fayette, Fisher, Floyd, Foard, Fort Bend, Franklin, Freestone, Frio, Gaines, Galveston, Garza, Gillespie, Glasscock, Goliad, Gonzales, Gray, Grayson, Gregg, Grimes, Guadalupe, Hale, Hall, Hamilton, Hansford, Hardeman, Hardin, Harris, Harrison, Hartley, Haskell, Hays, Hemphill, Henderson, Hidalgo, Hill, Hockley, Hood, Hopkins, Houston, Howard, Hudspeth, Hunt, Hutchinson, Irion, Jack, Jackson, Jasper, Jeff Davis, Jefferson, Jim Hogg, Jim Wells, Johnson, Jones, Karnes, Kaufman, Kendall, Kenedy, Kent, Kerr, Kimble, King, Kinney, Kleberg, Knox, La Salle, Lamar, Lamb, Lampasas, Lavaca, Lee, Leon, Liberty, Limestone, Lipscomb, Live Oak, Llano, Loving, Lubbock, Lynn, Madison, Marion, Martin, Mason, Matagorda, Maverick, McCulloch, McLennan, McMullen, Medina, Menard, Milam, Mills, Mitchell, Montague, Montgomery, Moore, Morris, Motley, Nacogdoches, Navarro, Newton, Nolan, Nueces, Ochiltree, Oldham, Orange, Palo Pinto, Panola, Parker, Parmer, Pecos, Polk, Potter, Presidio, Rains, Randall, Reagan, Real, Red River, Reeves, Refugio, Roberts, Robertson, Rockwall, Runnels, Rusk, Sabine, San Augustine, San Jacinto, San Patricio, San Saba, Schleicher, Scurry, Shackelford, Shelby, Sherman, Smith, Somervell, Starr, Stephens, Sterling, Stonewall, Sutton, Swisher, Tarrant, Taylor, Terrell, Terry, Throckmorton, Titus, Tom Green, Travis, Trinity, Tyler, Upshur, Upton, Uvalde, Val Verde, Van Zandt, Victoria, Walker, Waller, Ward, Washington, Webb, Wharton, Wheeler, Wichita, Wilbarger, Willacy, Williamson, Wilson, Winkler, Wise, Wood, Yoakum, Young, Zapata, and Zavala counties; and all Texas cities, including: Austin, Bastrop, Cedar Creek, Kyle, Buda, Driftwood, Wimberley, Lockhart, San Marcos, New Braunfels, Blanco, Dripping Springs, Spicewood, Jonestown, Pflugerville, Round Rock, Andice, Georgetown, Walburg, Cedar Park, Leander, Liberty Hill, Lago Vista, Marble Falls, Kingsland, Coupland, Hutto, Taylor, Thrall, Lexington, Rockdale, Manor, Elgin, Smithville.